Archive for News Items

Remain Vigilant to Stop the Spread of COVID-19

The recent rise in COVID-19 cases across the United States is a serious reminder of the strength and longevity of this pandemic. 

Many people may have “covid fatigue” and miss living the lives we once did. We shouldn’t let our guard down or it may be much, much longer before we will be able to live those lives again. While communities have focused on avoiding large gatherings, which is appropriate, the spread of the infection in this second surge has been attributed to smaller, casual gatherings that are deceptively safe.

With the holidays upon us, it has never been more important to double down on our efforts to exercise good judgment with our behaviors. These behaviors may contribute to our ability as a community to limit the continued spread of coronavirus.

Be vigilant in your actions by doing the following for the foreseeable future:

  • Wear a mask
  • Wash your hands, frequently
  • Keep physical distances
  • Avoid social gatherings of those outside your immediate household
  • Stay home when you are sick

 

Securely Deposit Checks Using Mobile Deposit

Still mailing your deposits to the credit union? Is remote work and COVID making travel to the branch more difficult?

With the AllCom Credit Union mobile banking app, you can quickly and securely deposit a check from anywhere in the world directly to your AllCom account. Using the same credentials as online banking, log into the app and click “Mobile Deposit”. Choose your desired account, enter the individu­al check amount and take a photo of the front and back. Be sure to sign the back and write “For Mobile Deposit at AllCom CU”. Submit the deposit.

Funds are normally received in two business days, faster than the postal mail and more secure because your personal details never leave your side.

Have a large deposit above the typical mobile deposit limits or need assistance with mobile banking or mobile deposit? Simply contact us at 888.754.9980 during regular business hours and one of our Member Service Representatives will gladly assist you.

Learn more about mobile deposit and mobile banking.

AllCom’s 10-Point Commitment to Member Service

Debbie C. Guiney, President & CEO, AllCom Credit Union

“We remain committed to providing a level of service not commonly found today, never losing sight of our roots and the fact that the Credit Union is owned by its members.

This ideal, which is the foundation on which we were built almost 100 years ago, guides us every step of the way. We are stronger than ever and prepared for the future.”

Debbie C. Guiney
President & CEO

1.Our Members are Our Most Important Asset
• All Members share ownership in AIICom Credit Union.
• We work to serve you and your needs, not those of stockholders.

2. We Value Your Business
• We realize that membership in a credit union is a choice.
• We promise to show our appreciation when you visit our branch,
contact us by phone, visit our website or email us.

3. Every Dollar of Your Deposits is 100% Insured
• Federal NCUA insurance provides up to $250,000 of coverage.
• Funds in excess of $250,000 are fully insured by MSIC.

4. Confidence in Our Legacy of Safety & Security
• Since 1922, we’ve been a trusted financial resource.
• President & CEO Debbie Guiney has served our members for more than 40 years. Many other employees have been with AllCom for
over 20 years.

5. We are Committed to the Central Massachusetts
Community
• All those who live, work or attend school here* are welcome.
• New members are vital to our institution and we welcome your
referrals.

6. We Offer a Superior Level of Service
• Employees know you by name when you visit the branch.
• Your call is always important. REAL people answer our telephones.

7. Our Deposit & Loan Products are Competitively Priced
• We shop the competition regularly; comparing their rates to ours.
• Special offers give our members the opportunity to save and earn
more money.

8. Your Loan Application is Given Priority
• Decisions on auto loans and other consumer loans can be provided
in as little as 15 minutes – apply in person, online or over the phone.
• Can’t make it to the branch? We can come to you to close your loan.
• Qualified borrowers may be eligible for electronic loan closings.

9. We are Making AllCom More Convenient for Members

• CO-OP Shared Branching gives members access to more than 5,600
credit union branches nationwide.
• SUM & CO-OP ATM networks give members access to thousands of
surcharge-free ATMs with more added each day.
• Online and mobile banking with deposit capture is available to all
members.

10. We Want to be Your First Choice for Mortgage Lending
• A wide choice of rates, terms and products are available to fit your
borrowing needs.
• Programs include home mortgages, home equity loans, FHA/VA
mortgages and more.

We’d love to meet your friends and family!
Your friends and family can earn you money.
Visit allcomcu.org for more information.

Protecting Your Data from Third-Party Finance Services

Are you using a personal finance app to help manage your money? If you are, you aren’t alone.

Consumers across the country are increasingly turning to apps like Dave.com, RobinHood.com, CashApp, and countless others to monitor their spending. While these apps may provide a platform for viewing and working with multiple accounts, they also increase the risk of having financial information breached. In fact, a recent breach at Waydev affected 7.5M consumers.

If you are leveraging any of these tools, there are some important steps you can take to protect your personal information.

  1. 1. Examine the terms of service for apps you are using.
    • Review the app’s data retention policies and determine whether the app resells your information.

  2. 2. Find out what security features the app offers to ensure your personal information remains safe.
    • Look for things like two-factor authentication.

  3. 3. Always confirm the validity of the app.
    • Don’t provide your account numbers or any personal or financial information on the phone or online unless you initiate the conversation and you know the organization.

  4. 4. Change your passwords and security settings often and use a highly secure password for your financial accounts.
    • Secure passwords often contain letters, numbers, and special characters.
    • Avoid using the same username and password on multiple sites.
    • Guard your pins and passwords. Don’t store them on your phone or write them down in a location where others might be able to access them.

  5. 5. Change your credit union and other account passwords if you want to remove an app’s access to your accounts.

  6. 6. Contact us at 888-754- 9980 right away if you feel your information has been compromised!

Always use extreme care when using third party apps. The more services you sign up for and the more devices you use provides criminals additional opportunities to steal your information for their personal gain.

9 Tips to Bring New Life to Your Finances

When spring is in the air, it’s time to put away those winter sweaters and pull out your summery shorts. It’s also a great time to clean your financial house, casting aside old habits and starting new ones. As flowers begin to bloom and birds return to their nests, give yourself a fresh financial start, too. 

Here are nine ways to clear the cobwebs from your wallet and get your financial plan neat and tidy for 2020.

  1. Review your spending, create a budget and set up automated savings

If you don’t have emergency savings, you’re not alone: Nearly 60% of Americans don’t have enough money to cover a $500 emergency, according to a Bankrate survey. Increasingly, workplaces are helping people to contribute to an emergency fund alongside retirement plans like 401(k) accounts, and if that option is unavailable, individuals can use direct deposit to set aside emergency funds.

  1. Throw away your debt

Debt is like that clutter in the closet that’s taking up space you need for something else, including reaching goals like buying a new home. Just as you’d go through your closet, start out by assessing the debt you already have. While you may not be able to pay everything off, with some discipline you can make real changes.

  1. Perform your own self-evaluation to keep your career growing

Take stock of where you are at work, including your salary. Check the salary range for your job, know what you’re worth and create a negotiation plan. If 2020 is the year you need to take a career break to take care of your family, think about how to maintain your skills through volunteering or continued learning while you take time off from paid work.

  1. Spruce up retirement plan contributions

If you began the year with a raise, a good bonus or even got a great tax return, you likely have already begun planning a summer vacation, started looking at new cars or making other plans. Consider setting some of that aside for the future by adding to your workplace account or in an individual retirement account.

  1. Review your tax withholding

If you got a big tax refund in 2019, it likely feels like a bonus. But it really means you were paying more than you should have last year, giving Uncle Sam money that you could have put to work for your own needs. Set up withholding so that you get the most out of your paycheck through the year without owning any money at tax time in 2021.

  1. Dust off your estate plans

Doublecheck your list of beneficiaries to see if anything has changed in the last year. A change in any relationship, like getting married, will likely prompt an immediate change. Also consider whether any life changes would impact elements of an estate plan, including any power of attorney documents.

  1. Review insurance needs

Spring is a great time to consider whether any life changes, like having a newborn or getting married, create a need for financial protection. If someone depends on your income for any number of reasons, it’s worth considering whether life insurance will work for you. It’s also a great time to review homeowners or rental insurance policies as well.

  1. Put a new shine on your financial plan (with an adviser)

Whether it’s an accountant for tax planning or a financial adviser for investment and insurance advice, it’s important to find a professional who can help you review your accounts and provide recommendations on how to best reach your financial goals. In current volatile markets, for example, it’s important to know what’s happened in your portfolio and to use any investment losses to reduce capital gains taxes.

  1. Sow the seeds of your financial future

Begin to think about financial goals for the rest of the year and beyond — what seeds can you plant today to reap the rewards you seek? Focus on what you want for yourself and your family, with a near-term budget and some long-term ideas, including saving for retirement. Do you want to go on a big family vacation this summer? In retirement, do you want to live in an urban area and volunteer? Do you want to climb mountains?

As you shake the dust off your financial plan and imagine your future, cleaning house can help you understand how much it will cost and start thinking about ways to keep you finances in order throughout the year ahead. The sky’s your limit.

Source: Kiplinger

 

8 Ways to Keep Your Money Saving Goals in 2020

Pop quiz: If you had a medical emergency or your car blew a tire, would you have enough money saved up to cover it? If your answer is no, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, almost 28% of American adults have no savings, while only 25% have a so-called rainy-day fund—albeit one that can’t cover three months’ worth of living expenses, according to Bankrate’s most recent Financial Security Index.

With New Year’s resolutions on everyone’s minds, you may be thinking about how you can spend less and save more in the coming year. Here are some easy ways to keep you on a money-saving track all the way to 2021, and beyond.

Have a Goal

You’re much more likely to change your spending habits if you’re saving with something specific in mind. It could be something as large as a two-week vacation or a down payment on a house—in which case, you can also mentally prepare for what will be more of a savings marathon. If your focus is on (relatively) smaller items like a new laptop or winter coat, consider it more of a sprint—and once you achieve it, you should add something else, big or small, to your wish list.

Track Non-Essential Spending

Regardless of how big your target figure is, you need to see where all of your dollars are going before you can figure out how much you’ll be able to put away. To do this, on the first day of next month, look at what you spent the previous month, putting essentials and non-essentials into different buckets. Consider what you could forego and commit to socking that money away. For example, can you skip takeout twice a week and cook at home instead? As for the actual figure you should be saving, 10% to 20% of your income each month is a good benchmark.

Get Rid of High-Interest Debt

There’s no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to high-interest debt, which is most commonly associated with credit card bills. Assuming you have a little money squirreled away in an emergency fund, high-interest debt is the first thing you should tackle before meeting long-term savings goals. On the other hand, if you have no emergency fund to speak of, start there before paying off high-interest debt.

Make It Automatic

Every month, schedule a recurring amount of money to be transferred regularly from your checking account to a linked savings account. This tactic relieves you of having to remember to make a deposit and reduces the risk of you spending the money before it’s saved. Even better: If you can, arrange to have part of your paycheck directly deposited into a savings account so that it never hits your checking account at all. And if you have access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, make automatic contributions to that as well.

Stick to the 24-Hour Rule

We’d be willing to bet that you buy more things online than at a store—which means you also know how tempting and easy it is to constantly visit your favorite online shop to see the latest inventory. The solution to avoiding impulse buys? Impose a 24-hour limit on hitting the “buy” button after placing items in your cart. Chances are good that by the next day, you’ll decide you don’t need them after all.

Don’t Spend “Found Money”

Whether you’re lucky enough to have grandparents who gift you $100 for your birthday or typically receive an annual tax refund, it’s best to put this money toward your savings goals rather than spending it. After all, it wasn’t there before, so you’ll never miss it. This applies to raises, too. Rather than spending more, put the difference into savings.

Consider Accounts With Tax Benefits

If your goals don’t require needing cash in the next one to three years, look into accounts that offer tax advantages. For longer-term goals like college and retirement, funding IRA accounts will give you tax savings and allow your money to grow over time through investments. (Note that before opening any new accounts, it’s always good to consult with your tax advisor.)

Don’t Go It Alone

Saving money isn’t always easy—if it were, there wouldn’t be so many articles written about it!—but if you know a friend, family member, or co-worker who is also trying to save, pairing up may help motivate you to stick to your plan. You can share progress, commiserate over hurdles, and have someone to lean on for support.

Source: The Muse

Financial New Year’s Resolutions for 2020

Looking to make some financial New Year’s resolutions for the coming year? Here are a few money resolutions to consider.

Resolve to do better next year.
The new year is a fantastic time to review your financial strengths, pore over your budget and make big plans for next year. Consider taking a moment to meet with your financial advisor or tax professional to review what worked this year and make changes for the year ahead.

Identify financial goals.
Before you can make progress toward any financial goals, identify what they are. Are you hoping to earn a degree? Buy a home? Repay your auto loan? Finally contribute to your employer 401(k)? Take some time to mull over what financial qualities you can improve this year. 

Start tracking your budget.
Before you commit to sticking to a budget, commit to track your spending each month. Spend some time identifying budgeting leaks, spending categories on which you tend to sink too much money and decisions about how to improve your spending for next year.

Check your credit report.
If you’ve stopped paying attention to your financial health, request a free credit report on annualcreditreport.com this year. Consumers are entitled to one free credit report each year from each of the three credit bureaus, which are Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. If everything looks correct, this exercise shouldn’t take more than an hour. Take stock of your debts and dispute anything that looks incorrect.

Boost retirement contributions.
If you’re looking to put money away for retirement, commit to boosting your 401(k) contributions. At the least, contribute enough to your workplace plan to secure your employer’s match, which is typically between 3% and 6%, if one is offered. Forgoing an employer match is like leaving free money on the table.

Cut back on bad money habits.
Identify a bad financial habit – eating out too often, paying full price for clothing, splurging on your pets – and promise to eradicate it this year. Identify alternatives or coping mechanisms when you want to indulge in your bad financial habit.

Evaluate last year’s financial mistakes.
Take an honest look at your financial performance last year. Did you overspend? Overborrow? Get passed over for a promotion? Not every financial downfall is avoidable, but some can be dodged or limited going forward. Reconsider your financial mistakes, and strive to perform better this year.

Source: U.S. News

How to Protect Yourself While Holiday Shopping Online

The holidays should be a time of joy as you spend time with friends and family. Stay ahead of online scammers and identity thieves by using these tips to help secure your personal information while shopping online.

Ship to a secure location
The rise of online shopping has led to an increase of home deliveries — and with it, an increase in “porch pirates”, or thieves who steal packages from doorsteps. If no one’s home to accept a package, consider shipping to your office or another safe place.

Only use official retailer apps to shop
Mobile apps allow you shop for and purchase items while you’re on the go — making holiday shopping a breeze. But the danger arises if you unknowingly install an app laced with malicious software, or malware.

Don’t save your credit card information on your accounts
While it may be convenient to store personal and payment information in your online accounts, it does come with risk. Retail websites may not be equipped to secure your info, which could leave your personal details and payment card data vulnerable.

Never make purchases on public WiFi
WiFi networks use public airwaves. With a little tech know-how and the freely available WiFi password at your favorite cafe, someone can intercept the data you send and receive while on free public WiFi.

Don’t get tripped up in holiday shopping scam emails
Sometimes, something in your email in-box can stir your holiday consumer cravings. Clicking on emails from unknown senders and unrecognizable sellers could infect your computer with viruses and malware. Delete them, don’t click on any links, and don’t open any attachments from individuals or businesses you are unfamiliar with.

Massachusetts Credit Unions 2020 College Scholarship Program

Do you know a high school senior planning to attend college in the 2020-2021 school year?

AllCom Credit Union is pleased to announce the Massachusetts Credit Unions 2020 College Scholarship Program. Sponsored by the Cooperative Credit Union Association, six (6) $1,500 scholarships will be awarded.

2020 College Scholarship Application

Application deadline: February 28, 2020

Scholarship Eligibility
1. Eligibility is limited to high school seniors who will be enrolled in an undergraduate college degree program during the 2020-2021 academic year.

2. Applicant or parent/guardian must be a member of the sponsoring credit union.

3. The credit union must be a member in good standing with the Cooperative Credit Union Association.

4. Each applicant must complete a current Association scholarship application form and submit it with the other required material to the sponsoring credit union.

5. Each credit union will select its top 3 applications and forward them to their chapter president. They must be accompanied by a cover letter from the sponsoring credit union CEO verifying that each applicant and/or parent/guardian is a credit union member.

Each chapter will select its scholarship winner evaluating each applicant on the same criteria the credit unions will be using: essay, grades and extracurricular/community activities.

Students must submit the following items with their completed applications. All items requested must be received in order for the application to qualify for consideration.

1. Students must submit a typewritten essay, in 250 words or less, about a person or event that has been an inspiration to you and how it has affected you and your outlook on life.

2. An academic transcript of grades.

If you have any questions, please call Erin Harvey, Branch Manager at 508.754.9980.

7 Budgeting Tips for Every Type of Budgeter

Budgeting doesn’t have to be unbearable. Whether you’re a first-timer or have struggled to budget in the past, these budgeting tips can make it less painful and more likely to stick.

1. Decide why you’re budgeting

Start by articulating what’s inspiring you to create a budget. Are you overspending, in debt or looking for expenses to trim? Maybe you’re saving up for something, like a wedding or new baby.

When budgeting with a partner, discuss the details together to ensure you’re on the same page.

2. Use empowering language

The term “budget” can be off-putting.

Try switching to language you’re more comfortable with, such as “spending plan,” to help keep you motivated.

A budget — or whatever you choose to call it — shouldn’t intimidate or restrict you. It should be an opportunity to take control of your money.

3. Select your budgeting method

Just as there are many reasons to budget, there are many ways to budget. Read up on different budgeting methods — like the 50/30/20 budget or the cash-based envelope system — and try one that fits your lifestyle.

If you give it a fair shot and can’t find a way to make it work, explore other options.

4. Prioritize expenses and goals

Understand the difference between needs and wants, then focus on the essentials first — those include groceries, housing and transportation costs. That doesn’t mean other expenses aren’t important, though. Your financial goals, such as paying off debt or saving for retirement, should still receive attention.

5. Leave room for surprises

Don’t expect your budget to be perfect. Surprises will happen, and some expenses may slip through the cracks. But you can take precautions to soften the blow.

Set aside a little bit of cash to cover miscellaneous expenses each month and make regular contributions to an emergency fund. That way you can handle an unexpected car repair or other emergencies without taking on credit card or loan debt.

6. Automate responsibly

Technology can help alleviate the tedious aspects of budgeting and prevent setbacks. Try setting up automatic transfers so you can regularly pay bills or sock money away without thinking about it, and lean on apps and tools to conveniently track your spending.

7. Revisit your budget monthly

Checking in on your budget at least once a month gives you the chance to deal with fluctuations in a timely manner. Depending on your style and the method you choose, you may decide to check in more frequently — that’s OK, too.

Source: NerdWallet

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